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Every year the Royal Society honours the hard work and achievements of researchers with medals and prizes named after the great scientists of the past. Among the award winners this year the Royal Society recognised five Oxford University Professors, including two from Medical Sciences, for their outstanding contributions to science and medicine

Royal Society medals

Professor Sir Peter Donnelly was presented with the Gabor Medal for his pioneering work in the genomic revolution in human disease research, transforming the understanding of meiotic recombination, and for developing new statistical methods.

Professor George Warimwe was awarded  The Royal Society Africa Prize for his work on zoonoses vaccine development, capacity building in Africa, and his innovative research proposal. He is currently working on viral infections that are transmitted between humans and animals in Africa with a focus on vaccine development for their control. While many of these viruses were first discovered in Africa, very little is known regarding their distribution, associated disease burden and viral genetic diversity in the continent.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website

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