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Led by the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, and jointly run by the Department for Continuing Education, this summer school invites EBHC students, supervisors, consumers, and leading evidence-based experts into the surroundings of Kellogg College, University of Oxford. 4-20 July. Spanning three weeks this unique experience offers: EBHC modules; non-accredited short courses; a selection of workshops and EBMLive 2022.

Close up of the Radcliffe Camera on a sunny day with a blossom tree in front. © Shutterstock

The aim of this summer school is to foster debate and engage with like-minded colleagues while offering additional learning relevant to evidence-based health care post pandemic.

During this event, dinners, lunches and other social events will be hosted.

Each summer school event must be registered for individually, enabling attendees to pick and choose which events they wish to attend. Concession rates are available upon registration for students in Medical and Health Sciences and Evidence-Based Health Care alumni (excluding the accredited module)

Find out more about the summer school on the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine website. 

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