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Audrey DaviesAudrey Davies, a final year student from Oxford University Medical School is the next heat winner of the nationwide Surgical Skills Competition celebrating future stars of the surgical field. The competition run by the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (www.rcsed.ac.uk) together with sponsors Medtronic (www.medtronic.com), took place recently at the John Radliffe Hospital. Following a tension-fuelled contest Audrey was anounced the winner, with Katriona Pierce receiving the runner-up prize.

On her win, Audrey said: ‘The competition was a great chance to practice skills under pressure and get one-to-one supervision from senior consultants. I feel lucky to have got a place in the National Final, and I'm looking forward to going to Edinburgh in March! I know that the exposure to different surgical skills and affiliating with the RCSEd will be a great way to start thinking about a career in surgery, both through the practical experience and also through meeting and speaking to people who know the field inside-out.’

Audery is set to join the additional 18 heat winners at the Grand Final in Edinburgh next spring.

With only 8% of medical undergraduates qualifying as surgeons in one of the ten specialities, surgery is an incredibly competitive area, so being able to demonstrate the commitment and the skills to become a surgeon at this early stage puts students at a great advantage later in their career.

Katriona PierceThe ground-breaking competition, now in its fourth year, sees final year medical students from across the UK demonstrate their surgical talents and skills in a series of challenges. The competition begins with 19 heats, one at each UK medical school, during which the students are asked to undertake a series of surgical tasks, such as suturing and knot-tying to laparoscopic skills tests with the winner of each heat announced on the night.

Audrey and the winners from each region along with one lucky randomly selected runner-up across the UK will receive a travel and accommodation package to Edinburgh to stay at the College's Ten Hill Place Hotel and to participate in the Grand Final. The competition will culminate in Edinburgh on 16 March 2019 at which the top 20 finalists will undertake a broad range of surgical procedures before determining who will be make the cut to become the overall winner presented at the Grand Final. 

As well as prizes awarded to the winner and runner-up, all participants of the competition will receive a certificate of participation, and gain two years’ affiliation to the RCSEd’s Affiliate Network.

To find out more about the Surgical Skills Competition, visit www.rcsed.ac.uk/surgicalskillscomp or follow on social media via #SurgicalSkillsComp

Images:

Top right - Audrey Davies

Below left - Katriona Pierce

 

 

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