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Up to 10% of women experience endometriosis worldwide. The condition is chronic, extremely painful, and can result in infertility. Endometriosis happens when tissue similar to the lining of the womb (the endometrium) grows outside of the womb, in the abdominal cavity and sometimes on the ovaries and the fallopian tubes. These tissues respond to the hormonal signals of the menstrual cycle just like the endometrium does, which can cause severe pelvic or period pain.

How and why endometriosis develops is unknown – and currently there’s no cure. While treatments such as painkillers, surgery and even hormonal contraceptives are available, they don’t always work, and many women find them to be insufficient.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, co-written by Krina Zondervan, (Nuffield Department of Women's and Reproductive Health) and Thomas Tapmeier (Monash University)

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