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Five school teachers joined researchers from the Carlyle, Lakhal-Littleton, Mommersteeg, Srinivas, and Stone groups, based in the Institute of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine (IDRM), Kavli Institute for Nanoscience Discovery, and Sherrington Building, in a project run in collaboration with Jesus College and Trinity College between 19 and 22 June 2023.

Secondary school science teachers (L-R) Catherine Garland, Gladys Kezia Jayaraman Nair, Jill Spencer, Claire Bradford, and Lindsay McDowell © Secondary school science teachers (L-R) Catherine Garland, Gladys Kezia Jayaraman Nair, Jill Spencer, Claire Bradford, and Lindsay McDowell

Five DPAG research groups hosted science teachers from state secondary schools in Oxfordshire and Wales as part of a one-week residential to increase teacher awareness and understanding of how and why research is conducted at a research institution. Each teacher undertook their residential at either Jesus or Trinity College, with a practical placement in a DPAG laboratory, to enable them to experience both science research and College life at Oxford first hand. In each lab, the teachers undertook a small research project to gather scientific data, and potentially lesson plans, to inspire their pupils in the classroom to apply to study STEM subjects at university level.

Three teachers joined researchers at the Institute of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine (IDRM). Claire Bradford joined Dr Oliver Stone's group, Lindsay McDowell worked in Professor Shankar Srinivas's group, and Gladys Kezia Jayaraman Nair was attached to Associate Professor Mathilda Mommersteeg's group for activities led by postdoctoral research scientist Dr Gennaro Ruggiero and DPhil student Esra Sengul. Researchers across each of the labs Dr Christophe RavaudDr Shifaan ThowfeequDr Jonathan Godwin, and Dr David Grainger assisted with the laboratory work.

Read the full story on the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics website. 

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