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Two different teams from the Medical Sciences Division have received a share of $14 million in funding from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative as one of 29 projects that will explore emerging ideas regarding the role of inflammation in disease.

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Two different teams from across Medical Sciences have been awarded a grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

Associate Professor Mathilda Mommersteeg, Professor Paul Riley,and Professor Robin Choudhury will use their award to perform single cell analysis of inflammation during heart regeneration. Professor Mark Coles, Dr Calliope Dendrou, and Dr Anita Milicic will combine their expertise to create the first map of adjuvant-induced inflammation on tissues from diverse ethnic groups and build a unique resource that will inform more inclusive global vaccine design and development.

While inflammation is a natural defense that helps our bodies maintain a healthy state, chronic inflammation results in harmful diseases such as asthma, arthritis, and heart disease, and can also play a role in organ failure, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, and many other conditions such as COVID-19.

The CZI welcomed 80 researchers to work on the two-year pilot projects, 75 percent of which are led by early-career scientists within six years of starting their independent position. Grantee teams are made up of two to three investigators with distinct areas of expertise and they represent 11 countries. 

Read full stories

Professor Mark Coles, Dr Calliope Dendrou, and Dr Anita Milicic research is explained in full on their departmental websites:

- The Jenner Institute

- The Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics

- Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences

Associate Professor Mathilda Mommersteeg, Professor Paul Riley,and Professor Robin Choudhury research is explained more fully here:

- Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics

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