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New research from Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics (DPAG), in collaboration with NHS Blood and Transplant, has demonstrated that the process of storing blood in blood banks can negatively impact the function of red blood cells and consequently may reduce the effectiveness of blood transfusions, a treatment commonly used to combat anaemia.

Blood bag

Carrying oxygen from our lungs and releasing it to the rest of our body tissues is the primary and most vitally important function of red blood cells. With over 2 billion cases globally, anaemia is the single most prevalent impairment to human health. The biological process that is most profoundly affected in many types of anaemia is oxygen delivery. To correct this, a very common hospital intervention is a transfusion of red blood cells. According to the European Medicines Authority, 35 units of blood are transfused annually per 1,000 inhabitants in the EU (2016), using donations from 2.3% of the population. To support this demand for blood, elaborate storage facilities and logistics have been implemented in healthcare systems, such as the NHS Blood and Transplant.

DPAG scientists from the Swietach Group, working in collaboration with NHS Blood and Transplant, have shown how the process of storing blood for transfusion can have a detrimental effect on oxygen handling by red blood cells. It has been acknowledged that storage affects the biochemistry of red cells, but the impact of this on gas handling has not so far been investigated. This new study is the first demonstration that blood storage can profoundly reduce the rate of oxygen release from red cells, and potentially compromise the effectiveness of blood transfusions. Critically, the effect of storage on gas handling was found to vary substantially between blood units from different donors, and only weakly correlated to storage duration, which is currently the primary index used for quality-control in blood banks. The study also showed how rejuvenation with specially designed chemical additives can fully restore gas exchange kinetics. 

Read the full story on the DPAG website

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