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Established in 1907, the Association of Physicians of Great Britain and Ireland (AoPGBI) has traditionally only invited the highest-profile doctors and researchers to its annual meeting. Now, they have made the landmark decision to open their (virtual) doors to the wider medical community, primarily to clinicians, early career researchers, discovery scientists and industry affiliates.

Association of Physicians of Great Britain & Ireland logo

The meeting (taking place on Monday 15 & Tuesday 16 March) is a rare opportunity to hear some of the UK and Ireland’s most esteemed medics and scientists share their first-hand views on selected medical issues of the day.

View the programme here

Speakers and their topics include:

Dr Rino Rappuoli, Chief Scientist of the vaccines division, GSK, on global preparedness and vaccines of the future.

Professor Ellie Barnes (Nuffield Departent of Medicine), on vaccines and elimination of viral hepatitis. Both speakers feature in a new series of podcasts by broadcaster, Vivienne Parry, and available to download here.

Professor Martin Landray (Nuffield Department of Population Health) on how using routine healthcare data will become the new normal in clinical trial work.

Professor Eva Morris (Nuffield Department of Population Health) on the establishment of the UK Colorectal Cancer Intelligence Hub.

Professor Dennis Lo from the Chinese University of Hong Kong on new insights into use of non-invasive DNA testing in blood for disease diagnosis. 

Professor Paul Workman, president of the Institute of Cancer Research, London on drugging the cancer genome, cancer evolution and drug resistance.

Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe, Nobel Prize winner 2019, and Director for the Target Discovery Institute, University of Oxford on cell detection and response to low oxygen could inform new treatments .

AoP Annual Meeting presentations can be viewed for one month from the 16th March via aopgbi.org- please register for access.

AoPGBI Podcasts

AoPcasts is a fascinating series of podcasts bringing cutting edge medical research to new audiences.  Produced by the Association of Physicians and hosted by science broadcaster Vivienne Parry, the series will explore some of the major themes debated at the annual AoP meeting. 

The first AoPcast brings together Rino Rappuoli, Chief Scientist of the vaccines division of GSK and Fellow both of the Royal Society and the US National Academy of Sciences, and Professor Ellie Barnes (Nuffield Departent of Medicine), globally celebrated for her work on hepatitis vaccines.

AoPcasts are available for download on the Association of Physicians website (aopgbi.org) and from your favourite podcast site. Listen to an AoPcasts podcast

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