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Oxford University and its colleges today announced a major new scholarship scheme for Black graduate students as part of a programme to transform its graduate population by creating more funding opportunities for under-represented groups.

Student in front of the Radcliffe Camera © Ashley Tsai / Graduate Photography Competition

The Black Academic Futures programme will provide up to 10 new scholarships to Black UK research students starting studies next year.

Further graduate funding opportunities for under-represented groups have been launched by the University and colleges, with targeted scholarships for students in the Humanities and the Faculty of Law, and with other measures being taken to widen participation in programmes within the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division, as well as  Medical Sciences.

Black UK graduate students are particularly under-represented at Oxford (around 1.5% of all postgraduate students compared with 4% across the UK sector). The Black Academic Futures scholarship programme aims to transform this position by rapidly increasing both applications from and funded places for well-qualified UK Black graduate students, reinforcing the University’s commitment to addressing race equality, and combatting discrimination. The new programme builds on the University’s commitment to increasing the number of promising postgraduate students from under-represented groups at Oxford. This includes the UNIQ+ access programme which provides research internships for prospective students from disadvantaged backgrounds, who may find progressing to postgraduate study challenging for reasons other than their academic ability.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website

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