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Sociologist Alex Rushforth (Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences), recently attended Oxford’s annual digital health pitching event, The Hill, for the first time. Here’s what he made of it.

Last month, a crowd composed largely of medical technology enthusiasts in the Oxfordshire area converged on Oxford University's Andrew Wiles Building for the annual digital health technology showcase, The Hill.

For those of you who are unfamiliar, the format of The Hill is reminiscent of TV shows like X-Factor and (especially) Dragon’s Den. 30 presenters each have only one minute and one slide to pitch a health app or device they have been developing (as individuals or part of a team). Following each presentation, the floor is opened to cross-examination by judges selected from sectors including universities, NHS, and industry. At the end of it all, the audience is invited to vote online for the winner. Those voted in the top-three are awarded prizes of £1000, as well as a period of one-to-one feedback from local technology consultants.  

Find out more (Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences website)

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