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A new institute for nanoscience research is to open in Oxford thanks to a $10 million gift from The Kavli Foundation.

Biochemistry Building Completion

The new Kavli Institute for NanoScience Discovery (Kavli INSD) at Oxford will be a unique combination of structural biology with world-leading biochemistry, pathology, chemistry, physics, physiology and engineering. Based in a new building at the centre of Oxford’s Science Area site, it will house more than 40 faculty and 400 students, postdocs and research staff.

It will be the 20th Kavli Institute globally and The Kavli Foundation’s fifth institute in nanoscience when it opens its doors in January 2021.

Professor Gavin Screaton, Head of Oxford University’s Medical Sciences Division, said: “Oxford has a rich tradition as a research-driven university and the addition of a Kavli Institute will enhance that collaborative nature that helps us to deliver exceptional education, to carry out world-leading research, and to make significant contributions to society – locally, nationally and internationally.

'The multidisciplinary nature of nanoscience broadens the possibilities for discoveries, which can translate into innovations that can benefit economies and humanity worldwide, such as the development of the gene-editing technology CRISPR.'

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

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