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Research into the early detection of ovarian cancer by the Ahmed group at the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (MRC WIMM) receives a boost thanks to a gift of £43,000 from the Dianne Oxberry Trust.

© Dr Siobhan Ferguson & Ian Hindle (Dianne Oxberry Trust), Prof Ahmed Ahmed, Abdulkhaliq Alsaadi & Mara Artibani (Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, NDWRH, Oxford University)

The donation will support doctoral candidate Abdulkhaliq Alsaadi in this research by covering the stipend and other costs associated with his final year of study, including research consumables.

More than 250,000 women around the world are diagnosed with ovarian cancer every year, with almost half dying from the disease. This makes ovarian cancer the most common cause of death from a gynaecological malignancy. Late diagnosis a key contributing factor.

At Oxford, a concerted effort is being made to better understand the origins of the disease. Led by Ahmed Ahmed, Professor of Gynaecological Oncology in the Nuffield Department of Women’s and Reproductive Health, researchers are utilising cutting-edge methodologies to classify the cells in the fallopian tube – thought to be the organ from which most ovarian cancers develop. It is hoped that this will lead to the discovery of new biomarkers that could be used for pre-cancer screening.

Read more (MRC WIMM website)

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