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Athena SWAN Silver has been awarded to the Department of Psychiatry and the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine in recognition of their commitment to advancing women's careers in science and medicine in academia.

Athena SwanThe latest round of awards announced by the Equality Challenge Unit today mean that Departments and units in the Division now hold 4 Silver and 14 Bronze awards.

Professor John Geddes, Head of the Department of Psychiatry, commented upon hearing of the department’s Silver award, “This is an incredibly important step for the Department. It is the result of a great deal of hard work and real change over the last few years, led by Liz Tunbridge and the Athena SWAN Committee and with major effort and engagement from across the Department. We certainly won’t stop here in pursuing greater equality for women and will now start our planning for a Gold award."

Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe, Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine said, “I am absolutely delighted to hear this news. It is an important milestone in our efforts to make Oxford Medicine, and the Department in particular, a destination of choice for ambitious female doctors and biomedical scientists. I am extremely grateful for all the hard work from so many, which has brought about the changes underpinning this Athena SWAN Silver Award.”

The Head of the Medical Sciences Division, Professor Alastair Buchan, remarked, “As a Division we are committed to improving the culture for all our staff and students. These awards recognise the continued effort of our departments to support all their members to achieve their potential.”

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