Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Researchers at the Botnar Research Centre (Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology & Musculoskeletal Sciences) have developed technology that facilitates standalone long-read Oxford Nanopore sequencing of single cells. This breakthrough technology has the potential to open new avenues within genomics and enable future discoveries to understand the causes of many human diseases.

Illustration of a strand of DNA

The work, in part supported by grants from the UKRI (Innovate UK, EPSRC and MRC), results from a collaboration with researchers from the Department of Chemistry at Oxford University, ATDBio, a world leader in complex oligonucleotide chemistry, and pharmaceutical company BristolMyersSquibbs. The study has been published in this week’s issue of Nature Biotechnology

“The application of accurate long-read single-cell sequencing will have a transformative effect on the wider single-cell sequencing community, as longer and full-length transcriptomic sequencing allows users to capture more information about the transcriptional and functional state of a cell,” says Assistant Professor Adam Cribbs, senior author of the paper and Group Leader in Systems Biology and Next Generation Sequencing Analysis at the Botnar Research Centre. “This means that we move closer to being able to better understand and diagnose diseases such as cancer”. 

Read the full story on the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology & Musculoskeletal Sciences website

Similar stories

Oxford vaccine reaches one billion doses released

The University of Oxford’s and our partners AstraZeneca have today announced that one billion doses of the ChAdOx1 nCov-19 coronavirus vaccine have been released, to more than 170 countries, marking a key milestone as part of the University and AstraZeneca’s joint vision to make the available to the world, on a not-for-profit basis for the world during the pandemic, and in perpetuity for low- and middle-income countries.

Research programme tackling COVID-19 variants of concern receives funding boost

A gift from the Red Avenue Foundation will enable the expansion of a major research programme aimed at rapidly identifying and interrogating emerging COVID-19 variants.

Phase I trial begins of new vaccine against the Plague

Researchers at the University of Oxford today launched a Phase 1 trial to test a new vaccine against plague.

New therapeutic targets identified in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

Researchers identify two inflammatory-driving proteins, osteopontin and CCL2, highly expressed in psoriatic arthritis joints.

Treatment choice for rotator cuff disorders could create efficiency and savings for the NHS

A trial that evaluated the clinical and cost effectiveness of physiotherapy treatments for rotator cuff disorders suggests cost savings can be made while maintaining positive patient outcomes.