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Later this week, The George Institute for Global Health and the Entrepreneurship Centre will be hosting Big Change: Sustainable Healthcare for the 21st Century, a significant international event that will address the issues and challenges facing healthcare this century.

This meeting will involve selected group of high-profile politicians, academics, entrepreneurs, investors and journalists in an interactive programme of challenge and debate.

The healthcare challenge facing humanity is unprecedented. Current systems are not sustainable and the world requires a fundamentally different way to deliver healthcare to all who need it. All around the globe healthcare systems are struggling to meet the demands of growing and ageing populations that have high expectations of the healthcare they want to receive. This is particularly true in the developed world, but it is also evident in emerging markets such as India and China. These economies have created new middle class populations that have contributed to dramatic rises in the prevalence of non-communicable disease such as cancers, heart disease and diabetes. Not only that, but the poor still suffer from disease associated with poverty such as malaria, TB and HIV.

Big Change: Sustainable Healthcare for the 21st century takes place on the 22 and 23 November 2013, at the Saïd Business School.

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