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The 2019 Teaching Excellence Awards have been celebrated in a ceremony at Merton College on Wednesday 23 October. The ceremony was hosted by the Head of Division, Professor Gavin Screaton, the Deputy Head of Division (Education), Professor David Vaux, and the Head of Education Policy and Planning, Jane Dale.

Group photo of Teaching Excellent Awards 2019 awardees © Image credit: Rema Ramakrishnan

The Teaching Excellence Awards scheme has been in place since 2006, recognising and rewarding excellence in teaching, supervision, the organisation and development of teaching, and support for teaching and learning, within a research-intensive environment. They formally acknowledge significant educational achievements, reward individuals who have exceeded expectations in carrying out their duties, and support the aspirations of those who wish to innovate and enhance our educational provision.

This year we saw the highest number of nominations and awardees to date, and increased funding allowed for more and larger projects to benefit, enhancing students’ education and supporting other educational priorities.

This year’s prizes were awarded to the following staff from across the Division:

Major Educator - Dr Proochista Ariana

Lifetime Achievement - Professor Carl Heneghan, Dr Tim Littlewood, Dr Helen Salisbury, Dr Paul Azzopardi, Professor Ashok Handa, Professor Kevin Marsh

Excellent Teacher - Dr Anne Marie O’Donnell, Dr Deborah Hay, Dr Michael Gilder, Dr Nick Talbot, Dr Paul Fairchild, Dr Suzanne Stewart, Dr Lisa Heather, Professor Vicki Marsh, Dr John L. Kiappes, Dr Manuel Berdoy, Professor David Bannerman

Early Career Excellent Teacher - Dr Prabin Dahal, Mr Tanadet Pipatpolkai, Dr Naomi Petela 

Excellent Supervisor (new for 2019) - Dr Sarah Snelling, Professor Caroline Jones

Learning Support - Mrs Laura Rose, Ms Judy Irving, Mrs Gill McLure

Projects - 

  • Dr Christopher-James Harvey, Dr Damion Young, Dr Nicola Barclay; Dr Sumathi Sekaran, Dr Dimitri Gavriloff, Dr Simon Kyle (The Oxford Online Programme in Sleep Medicine: Remote Proctoring for Formative Assessment)
  • Dr Esther Park and Dr Andrew Soltan (Project Referrals) 
  • Dr Hussam Rostom (App-based adjuncts to support learning by undergraduate medical students and work experience students) 
  • Dr Natalie Voets and Prof Mark Jenkinson (Clinical MRI Neuroimaging workshop) 
  • Dr Robert Wilkins (Targeting outreach activities to potential applicants for Biomedical Sciences from black and ethnic minority backgrounds)
  • Professor David R. Greaves (Developing new eLearning resources for medical students)
  • Dr Deborah Hay and Dr Ricardo Carnicer Hijazo (Bench to Classroom: linking researchers with clinical teaching in Laboratory Medicine)
  • Prof Marella De Bruijn, Mr Bryan Adriaanse, Dr Danuta Jeziorska, Mrs Victoire Dejean, Dr Glenn Wells, Dr Paul Brankin, Megan Morys Carter (Pilot Course in Innovation Strategy for DPhil Students)

Congratulations to all of the awardees.

The 2019 awards had the highest number of nominations and awardees to date, and the largest ceremony attendance of over 100 people, which included families, friends, colleagues and students supporting the occasion.  During the ceremony the Major Educator award winner, Dr Proochista Ariana, gave an inspiring speech on the topic of diversity and inclusivity, and two of the Project awardee winners from 2017 gave presentations feeding back on the outcomes of their Projects: Dr Deborah Hay on Better lectures? A trial of in-lecture polling in Laboratory Medicine and Dr Ester Hammond on How to do science – Discussion groups on experimental design and reproducibility

The atmosphere at the ceremony was uplifting and celebratory and the evening was a tremendous success.

Photos of some of the 2019 Teaching Excellence Awards winners© Image credit: Rema Ramakrishnan

Find out more about the winners and the ceremony

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