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A study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization describes a plausible range for the risk of microcephaly in women who were infected with Zika virus during pregnancy compared to those who were not infected.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Investigators obtained data on the number of notified and confirmed microcephaly cases in each Brazilian state between November 2015 and October 2016 from the health ministry. For Pernambuco State, one of the hardest hit, weekly data were available from August 2015 to October 2016 for different definitions of microcephaly.

Read more (ISARIC website)

About ISARIC 

ISARIC – the International Sever Acute Respiratory and emerging Infection Consortium – is part of ZIKAlliance, a multinational and multi-disciplinary research consortium comprised of 53 partners worldwide and funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme. The consortium focuses on the impact of ZIKV infection during pregnancy and the natural history of ZIKV in humans and their environment. In collaboration with two other EU-funded consortia (ZikaPLAN and ZIKAction), ZIKAlliance is working to develop a preparedness platform in Latin America and the Caribbean. 

ISARIC’s Coordinating Centre - based at the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health in Oxford University's NDM Research Building - is leading on the activities of work package 8 (Communication, Dissemination, and Evaluation), and co-leading work package 11 (ZIKA COLLAB).

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