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Unless exposed to positive research experience and role models during their medical education and training, women are unlikely to consider careers in academic medicine seriously.

That's one conclusion of an Oxford University study published in The Lancet. It asked why, when entry to medical schools is evenly split between men and women, those working in University medical departments are predominantly men.

In the UK, women make up 55% of medical school entrants but just 28% of faculty. In the US, they are 47% of entrants but 38% of faculty. The study reviewed 52 pieces of research evidence from the last thirty years to test eight themes often proffered as reasons for women's under-representation in the medical academic workforce.

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