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The Oxford Medical School Gazette (OMSG), the oldest running student medical journal in the world, has been shortlisted for the student publication of the year prize at this year’s Guardian Student Media Awards. The prize will be judged by leading industry figures, and winners will announced at a ceremony in London on 27 November.

OMSG coverThe Oxford Medical School Gazette (OMSG) is a tri-annual publication written, edited and designed by students at Oxford University Medical School. The idea for the Gazette was hatched in 1947 by a small group of impoverished medical students led by Geoffrey Smeardon. After obtaining sponsorship from the Oxford Brewery – and using funds from their own ex-service grants – they scraped together enough money to produce the first edition in 1949. In continuous publication since then, the Gazette is proudly the oldest medical student journal in the world.

The OMSG has evolved dramatically since its inception. It has moved from A5 to A4 size, commissions print runs of over 1200, and has a growing presence on social media outlets. Its contributors are drawn from the medical school, the medical sciences and beyond, with notable articles penned by academics and alumni alike. A peer review section aims to showcase interesting clinical research being undertaken by medical students across the UK and internationally. Additionally, OMSG hosts a Schools Essay Competition and the Frith Photography Prize, encouraging both prospective and current students to engage with medical sciences in more non-traditional ways.

Editors Joshua Luck and Barnabas Gilbert commented: “We are, of course, thrilled to be shortlisted for the award. To see our medical school journal – albeit the longest-running of its kind in the world – rivalling major university newspapers in the race for the top award, speaks volumes for the dedication and talent of our committee. All the more impressive that this is our first entry, in a year when the competition received more submissions than ever before. Congratulations to everyone at the OMSG - and fingers crossed for November 27th!" 

University of Oxford's cherwell.org and bangscience.org have also been shortilisted for best student website in this year’s awards.

Additional information:
The Gazette is available free of charge to all clinical students of Oxford Medical School and has subscribers in all corners of the world. Readership encompasses alumni, academics and doctors; schools, universities and teachers; as well as professional institutions and Royal Colleges. It covers all aspects of medical life: from scientific review, opinion, comment and discussion, to comedy, profiles, crosswords and everything in between. Full runs are held at the Cairns Library of the John Radcliffe Hospital and at the British Library in London.

Please visit OMSG’s soon-to-be renovated website (www.omsg-online.com) or contact the Editors via email (editors@omsg-online.com).

Links:
Guardian Student Media Awards 2013: shortlists revealed
Oxford Medical School Gazette
cherwell.org 
bangscience.org

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