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Kaveeta Malhi, a first-year Oxford student studying Medicine nominated her former school teacher at Springwood High School in Norfolk, Simon Dawson, for an Oxford University Inspirational Teachers Award. Simon is one of 10 winners who will receive an Oxford University Inspirational Teachers Award this year.

University of Oxford Inspirational Teachers Award Logo

The Inspirational Teachers Awards are a way of recognising the importance of school or college teachers in encouraging talented students to realise their potential and make a successful application to Oxford. Each year, current first-year Oxford undergraduates from UK state schools or colleges with a limited history of sending students to Oxford are asked if they would like to nominate an inspirational teacher.

As part of her nomination Kaveeta wrote; "Mr Dawson is the most passionate and inspirational teacher I have ever had. [His] enthusiasm was infectious - not only did he help us all succeed in three separate maths GCSEs, but made sure nobody was left behind, irrespective of ability. Every member of that class felt included and supported. [He] encouraged me the most to be the best I could be."

All the winning teachers and their nominating students will attend an awards ceremony held by University of Oxford at Worcester College on 17 May 2019.

Congratulations to Simon and many thanks to Kaveeta for taking the time to tell us about her inspiring teacher.

More information about this year’s winning teachers and their students is available at www.ox.ac.uk/inspirationalteachers

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