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Omer Dushek has been awarded a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship to fund his innovative research into signalling models the Trust announced in July 2017.

Omer’s ambition is to assist researchers to comprehensively define the “laws of signalling pathways” for the first time, leading to improved and new therapies in the context of infection, cancer, autoimmunity and transplants.

Utilising his skills both as a mathematician and lab based researcher he hopes to formulate accurate phenotypic models of signalling pathways that can predict cellular responses.

 

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