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The Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology (NDOG) is pleased to announce that Professor Peter Hammond, a world leader in the analysis of facial dysmorphism in rare genetic syndromes, has joined the department.

Conditions like Williams syndrome affect facial traits (shown here next to an unaffected child) © Peter Hammond
Conditions like Williams syndrome affect facial traits (shown here next to an unaffected child)

The Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology (NDOG) is pleased to announce that Professor Peter Hammond, a world leader in the analysis of facial dysmorphism in rare genetic syndromes, has joined the department.

Peter’s research focuses on facial development and growth in teratogenic and genetic conditions where the detection of atypical face shape is an important part of diagnosis. There are more than 700 genetic syndromes with facial traits, many of which are extremely difficult to spot because of rarity or subtlety of associated features.

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