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An important regulator that controls the ability of tumour cells to hide from the immune system in lymphoma patients, making them unlikely to respond to standard treatment, has been discovered by scientists at the University of Oxford.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Researchers funded by the blood cancer charity Bloodwise analysed tumour samples from individual patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), alongside cell line models and data on treatment response and survival. 

DLBCL, an aggressive cancer affecting white blood cells, is diagnosed in around 5,000 people each year in the UK. There are several different subtypes of the disease, each of which differs in its response to chemotherapy.

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