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Scientists from two departments within University of Oxford Medical Sciences Division have been awarded research grants by the British Medical Association.

Dr Lynda Coughlan (left) and Dr Jeremy Howick (right) receiving their awards
Dr Lynda Coughlan (left), BMA President, Professor Pali Hungin (centre) and Dr Jeremy Howick (right)

Dr Jeremy Howick and Prof Paul Nicholas Aveyard from Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences were awarded the Dawkins & Strutt grant of almost £60,000 to support pioneering research into pain treatment. The HC Roscoe grant of £50,000 was awarded to Jenner Institute scientists from Nuffield Department of Medicine, Dr Lynda Coughlan and Prof Adrian Hill, who will use the funding to develop improved vaccines for influenza and other emerging infectious diseases.

The work of the BMA Foundation continues to be a success, and each year we fund important, innovative projects to advance medical research. With research funding budgets constrained, we want to support and encourage the medical profession in pursuing high-quality research projects that deliver important improvements in patient care. - Dr Mark Porter, BMA council chair and chair of the foundation trustees commenting on the awards

Fifteen medical academics and research scientists were awarded a total of £500,000 at this year’s prestigious BMA Foundation for Medical Research Awards on Tuesday 22 November. The awards were presented by BMA President, Professor Pali Hungin.

The BMA was one of the first professional bodies to award grants and prizes, with the aim of encouraging and furthering medical research. These grants fund basic and clinical medical research, covering a diverse range of research areas including pain treatment, viral infection and cancer. The BMA Foundation for Medical Research Awards has had a significant impact on the professional development of grant winners, with 96 per cent of previous winning researchers saying that being awarded the grant contributed to their future research. 

Commenting on her award, Dr Coughlan said: “As an early-career researcher starting to establish independence, this grant will have a huge impact on my future careerExosomes are a new and exciting breakthrough in health-innovation and we hope that support of this research will lead to the development of improved vaccines for infectious disease in the near future”.

Dr. Howick commented: “This award will generate the evidence base required for a research programme that promises to tackle the growing problem with too much medicine in the growing ageing population that suffers from pain

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