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DPhil Study Day Logo

This year’s 14th Annual Medical Sciences DPhil Day, a student-organised symposium, proudly showcased the varied and excellent biomedical and clinical research carried out by DPhil students across the Medical Sciences Division.

The event gave students the opportunity to present to their peers and see an exciting cross-section of ongoing research at Oxford’s many research sites.

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Over 100 attendees attended 15 student talks covering a wide breadth of topics including neuroscience, organ transplantation, structural biology and vaccine design. Prizes were awarded to Malte Kaller (1st) and Janine Grey (2nd) for their outstanding presentations on myelination and drug development and active audience involvement was recognised with a prize for the best audience question awarded to Lancelot Millar. Students were also given the opportunity to present their posters with prizes awarded to Layal Liverpool (1st) and Amy Flaxman (2nd) for their work on host-viral interactions and microbiomes, respectively.

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In addition to student presentations, Naomi Gibson, MSD Public Engagement Coordinator, spoke to students on the topic of Public Engagement, its increasing importance and how students can become involved as an integral part of their research careers.

The keynote lecture was provided by Professor Eleanor Riley of The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Soon to take up a new post as Director of the Roslin Institute at Edinburgh University, we would like to thank Professor Riley for taking time travel to Oxford and share her insights from a long and inspiring career in multidisciplinary infectious disease research and malaria immunology.

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The organising committee would also like to extend their thanks to Jane Rudman, Professor Afsie Sabokbar, Veliborka Milivojevic, our sponsors*, and to all the students who attended and presented their research for making the event a great success.

If you are interested in joining the organising committee for the 2018 event, please contact us or Jane Rudman for more information.

DPhil Day 2017 Committee

Agata Antepowicz, Alice Stelfox, Kento Kawai, Francesca Donnellan and Norbert Volkmar

 

Our sponsors

*Gilson, MACS Miltenyi Biotec, PeproTech, Sarstedt, Triplered

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