Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

DPhil Study Day Logo

This year’s 14th Annual Medical Sciences DPhil Day, a student-organised symposium, proudly showcased the varied and excellent biomedical and clinical research carried out by DPhil students across the Medical Sciences Division.

The event gave students the opportunity to present to their peers and see an exciting cross-section of ongoing research at Oxford’s many research sites.

3.JPG

Over 100 attendees attended 15 student talks covering a wide breadth of topics including neuroscience, organ transplantation, structural biology and vaccine design. Prizes were awarded to Malte Kaller (1st) and Janine Grey (2nd) for their outstanding presentations on myelination and drug development and active audience involvement was recognised with a prize for the best audience question awarded to Lancelot Millar. Students were also given the opportunity to present their posters with prizes awarded to Layal Liverpool (1st) and Amy Flaxman (2nd) for their work on host-viral interactions and microbiomes, respectively.

5.JPG

In addition to student presentations, Naomi Gibson, MSD Public Engagement Coordinator, spoke to students on the topic of Public Engagement, its increasing importance and how students can become involved as an integral part of their research careers.

The keynote lecture was provided by Professor Eleanor Riley of The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Soon to take up a new post as Director of the Roslin Institute at Edinburgh University, we would like to thank Professor Riley for taking time travel to Oxford and share her insights from a long and inspiring career in multidisciplinary infectious disease research and malaria immunology.

2.JPG

The organising committee would also like to extend their thanks to Jane Rudman, Professor Afsie Sabokbar, Veliborka Milivojevic, our sponsors*, and to all the students who attended and presented their research for making the event a great success.

If you are interested in joining the organising committee for the 2018 event, please contact us or Jane Rudman for more information.

DPhil Day 2017 Committee

Agata Antepowicz, Alice Stelfox, Kento Kawai, Francesca Donnellan and Norbert Volkmar

 

Our sponsors

*Gilson, MACS Miltenyi Biotec, PeproTech, Sarstedt, Triplered

Similar stories

Oxford spinout Optellum secures $14m funding to advance pioneering AI-powered lung cancer diagnosis technology

Optellum, a University of Oxford spinout that provides a breakthrough AI platform to diagnose and treat early-stage lung cancer, has raised $14 million in a Series A funding round.

New study shows higher rate of fractures in people with intellectual disability

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, researchers at the University of Oxford and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust found a substantially higher rate of fractures in people with intellectual disability compared with people of the same age and gender without an intellectual disability.

New evidence for how our brains handle surprise

A new study from the Bruno Group is challenging our perceptions of how the different regions of the cerebral cortex function. A group of ‘quiet’ cells in the somatosensory cortex that rarely respond to touch have been found to react mainly to surprising circumstances. The results suggest their function is not necessarily driven by touch, but may indicate an important and previously unidentified role across all the major cortices.

Language learning difficulties in children linked to brain differences

A new study using MRI has revealed structural brain changes in children with developmental language disorder (DLD), a common but under-recognised difficulty in language learning. Children with DLD aged 10-15 showed reduced levels of myelin in areas of the brain associated with speaking and listening to others, and areas involved in learning new skills. This finding is a significant advance in our understanding of DLD and these brain differences may explain the poorer language outcomes in this group.

The Gene Therapists Headline at Glastonbury 2022

Rosie Munday writes about her experience taking science to the masses at the Glastonbury Festival.