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The first MRC-DTP Symposium took place on 22 June 2017 in the Richard Doll Building at the Old Road Campus. The symposium was an opportunity for Medical Research Council funded students to network as well as present their research to peers. With sponsorship from Fisher Scientific and the Nuffield Department of Population Health, 52 people attended the symposium.

The MRC DTP Steering Group Chair, Prof. Marella de Bruijn opened the day and the first session featured talks from Ulrike Kuenzel, Soren Thomsen and Josephine Hellberg. The second session, chaired by Paolo Spingardi, brought together Jan Cosgrave, Abigail Enoch and Daniel Alanine. During the lunch break, poster sessions took place allowing researchers to showcase their work in an informal setting whilst providing a basis for discussion and networking. The afternoon had two parallel training sessions- a Managing Your Supervisor workshop led by Afsie Sabokbar, and a CV workshop from Michael Moss of the University of Oxford, Careers Service. The symposium closed with a ‘Speed Science’ session (think speed dating with science) followed by a wine reception.

Symposium3

Symposium participants commented:

“Good opportunity to present work to local and informal audience, good prep for conferences etc. Also interesting breadth of research.”

“The CV workshop was supreme and it was so wonderful networking with fellow MRC students and hearing about their work.

"Interesting to hear about different research being done; interesting to hear more about the MRC-DTP program”

With thanks to the Organising Committee:

Joost van Haasteren
Jessica Valli
Marella de Bruijn
Laura Colling
Marc Rose

Thanks also to Paolo Spingardi who provided assistance on the day. 

 

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