Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Collaborative Cancer Research UK-funded studies from University of Oxford researchers have uncovered a new mechanism by which cancer cells adapt to the stresses they encounter as they grow and respond to therapies. This mechanism involves cells releasing small vesicles, known as exosomes.

3D render of cells secreting exosomes © Shutterstock

This mechanism involves cells releasing small vesicles, known as exosomes. These contain complex mixtures of proteins, RNAs and other molecules, which can reprogramme surrounding cells. Exosomes are thought to be released by all cells in the body and play important roles in many processes in healthy individuals, such as immunity and reproduction. But, in cancer they can turn bad and drive pathological changes such as tumour growth and metastasis.

Read the full article (Unviersity of Oxford website)

Similar stories

Poor metabolic health linked to worse brain health

People with poor metabolic health are more likely to have memory and thinking problems and worse brain health, according to a new study by researchers at Oxford Population Health. The study is published in Diabetes Care, and is the largest study into metabolic and brain health to date