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How can genome editing improve human health? That's the theme researchers from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (MRC WIMM) took to the latest Royal Institution Family Fun Day in London.

MRC WIMM researchers were enthusiastic participants of the Family Fun Day at the Royal Institution in London this past Saturday, part of a series of events around this year's Ri Christmas Lectures. The action packed day included talks, demonstrations and experiments exploring the science behind what makes each of us unique.

The MRC WIMM's contribution focused on how genome editing is helping biomedical research, and was part of the UKRI sponsored rooms, representing the Medical Research Council. Our colourful stand explored the science of genome editing, from the basics of the technique to its applications in medical research. The stand was originally developed for the MRC Festival of Medical Research 2018, but has since been taken to the Oxford Science and Ideas Festival and several local schools.

Read more (MRC WIMM website)

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