Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Raising so-called 'good' cholesterol by blocking a key protein involved in its metabolism does not protect against heart disease or stroke, according to a large genetic study of 150,000 Chinese adults published in the journal JAMA Cardiology.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

There are two types of cholesterol in the blood: LDL-C, so-called 'bad' cholesterol, which is carried in low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and HDL-C, so-called 'good' cholesterol which is found in high-density lipoproteins (HDL).

Lowering LDL-C (e.g. by statins) has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of heart diseases and stroke, but the causal role of HDL-C is less clear even though observational studies have shown an inverse association between HDL-C and risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Read more (University of Oxford website)

Similar stories

Ancient gene mutation found to cause rare hereditary condition

General Research

UK scientists have found that a 7,000-year-old genetic mutation is responsible for a rare form of hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN).

National consortium to study threats of new SARS-CoV-2 variants

Coronavirus COVID-19 General Research

A new national research project to study the effects of emerging mutations in SARS-CoV-2 will be launched with £2.5 million funding from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI).

Immunology preprint reviews launched in Nature Reviews Immunology

General Research

The Oxford-Mount Sinai (OxMS) Preprint Journal Club has partnered with Nature Reviews Immunology to launch a monthly Preprint Watch column.

No limit to the benefits of exercise in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease

General Research

A new study led by the University of Oxford on over 90,000 participants shows that there is no upper threshold to the benefits of exercise in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease – ‘every move counts towards better cardiovascular health.’

Accurate predictions of ovarian cancer outcome possible with new classification system

General Research

The new, Oxford-developed method for subtyping ovarian cancer has been validated in a recent collaboration between the University of Oxford and Imperial College London. Dubbed the ‘Oxford Classic’, researchers have demonstrated that it enables the accurate prediction of patient disease outcome, as well as the development of new targeted cancer therapies.