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NightstaRx Ltd (Nightstar), a biopharmaceutical company spun out from the University of Oxford specialising in developing gene therapies for inherited retinal dystrophies, has announced that it has completed a $35 million  (£23.2 million) funding round. The round was led by New Enterprise Associates (NEA), one of the world’s leading venture capital firms.

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