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Congratulations to Professor Trish Greenhalgh (Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences) who has been Highly Commended in the O²RB Excellence in Impact Awards 2021.

O²RB Excellence in Impact Awards logo and profile picture of Professor Trish Greenhalgh

Professor Trish Greenhalgh was Highly Commended in the O²RB Excellence in Impact Awards 2021 for her significant contribution to policy discussions and public understanding of COVID-19 precautions internationally.

The other Highly Commended awardees are:

  • Dr Stephen Fisher, Mr Dan Snow, Ms Martha Kirby and Dr Zack Grant (Department of Sociology, University of Oxford)
  • Professor Rosa Freedman (University of Reading)
  • Professor Mark Graham and The Fairwork Foundation Team (Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford)
  • Professor Suzanne Graham (University of Reading)
  • Professor Tarunabh Khaitan (Faculty of Law, University of Oxford)
  • Dr Francesca Lessa (Oxford Department of International Development and Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford)
  • Professor Sandra Wachter and Dr Brent Mittelstadt (Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford)

The Highly Commended awardees have collaborated with policymakers, NGOs, industry partners and other academics around the world to bring about positive change in a diverse range of societal challenges. These range from improved conditions for workers in the gig economy and increased public understanding of COVID-19 precautions, to the safeguarding against abuse by humanitarian aid workers, and improved routes to justice for victims of transnational human rights violations. They also extend to the fields of foreign language teaching practices, the ethical use of AI, and discrimination law in India, as well as to public and government awareness of climate change attitudes.

Read the full story on University of Oxford's Social Sciences Division website.

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