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Many congratulations to Professor Jacobsen from MRC Molecular Haematology Unit and Radcliffe Department of Medicine, for this distinction, which recognises his research unravelling the haematopoietic roadmap.

This honour recognizes how Professor Jacobsen's work has impacted our understanding of normal and dysregulated stem cell biology and lineage specification, with a direct clinical impact on the management of blood disorders.

Prof Jacobsen pioneered research examining how mature blood cells are produced from haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), in particular by unravelling new pathways of lineage commitment, in work that has redrawn the “textbook” roadmap of normal hematopoiesis. His work has also influenced the field’s thinking on the processes underlying stem cell fate decisions and stem cell heterogeneity. In particular, his team showed that not all HSCs are destined to form all mature blood cell types despite possessing multipotency.

Read more (MRC Weatherall for Molecular Medicine website)

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