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Five graduate students currently studying at Oxford, including two Medical Sciences students, have been awarded £1,000 grants from the Vice Chancellor’s COVID-19 African Innovation Seed Fund for entrepreneurial projects aimed at addressing global challenges stemming from the pandemic.

Graphic of the globe, showing Africa in the centre

 

Professor Louise Richardson, Oxford's Vice Chancellor,  said, ‘I am proud to see how the five students have reimagined their research to address urgent global challenges created by the pandemic. Whilst completing their graduate courses in the midst of a global pandemic, they have unleashed their creativity and insight to support the most vulnerable in our societies.’

The COVID-19 African Innovation Seed Fund grants were awarded in partnership with the Oxford University Africa Society, during the 2021 Oxford Africa Conference. The five winners are reimagining their research and using their expertise to accelerate access to education, health services, and safe drinking water.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website

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