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Today, researchers from the University of Oxford have published further data from the Phase I/II clinical trials of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine, evidencing the decision to move to a two-dose regimen in ongoing phase III trials, and how ChAdOx1 nCov-19 induces broad antibody and T cell functions.

Researcher working on immunology in the lab

These findings are reported in two papers, both released in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Medicine.

Previous studies have shown that in order to develop any vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, two key elements of the immune system need to be activated: a neutralising antibody against the coronavirus spike protein which is likely to be critically important in protecting against the disease, as well as robust T cell responses.

Professor Katie Ewer, a lead author of one of the papers, said:

‘This highly detailed analysis of the immune responses to ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 further underpins the potential of this vaccine to induce protection against COVID-19 disease and provides additional reassurance of the safety of this approach.’

‘Using these advanced immunological techniques, we can better understand the different cellular and antibody-mediated mechanisms that contribute to the protection afforded by this vaccine, as demonstrated in the recent data from the subsequent Phase 3 trials’.

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

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