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The University of Oxford in partnership with AstraZeneca has taken the next steps in its commitment to broad and equitable global access to Oxford’s COVID-19 vaccine, following landmark agreements with the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), Gavi the Vaccine Alliance, and the Serum Institute of India (SII).

Scientist in biohazard protection clothing analysing sample with a microscope with another scientist holding coronavirus covid-19 blood sample tube on hand in a laboratory

AstraZeneca has reached a $750m agreement with CEPI and Gavi to support the manufacturing, procurement and distribution of 300 million doses of the vaccine, with delivery starting by the end of the year. In addition, the university and industry partnership reached a licensing agreement with SII to supply one billion doses for low-and-middle-income countries, with a commitment to provide 400 million before the end of 2020.

Together, the agreements mark the latest commitments to enable global access to the vaccine, including to low-and-middle-income countries, beyond the company’s recent partnerships with the UK and US. AstraZeneca is building a number of supply chains in parallel across the world to support global access at no profit during the pandemic and has so far secured manufacturing capacity for two billion doses of the vaccine.

Read more on the University of Oxford website

Our vaccine work is progressing quickly. To ensure you have the latest information or to find out more about the trial, please check the University of Oxford's latest COVID-19 research news or visit the COVID-19 trial website.

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