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A partnership between the University of Oxford and GRAIL, LLC will evaluate the use of a new, non-invasive, multi-cancer early detection test known as Galleri in suspected cancer patients.

Gloved hand holding two vials of blood in a laboratory setting
  • The national SYMPLIFY study aims to demonstrate this revolutionary technology can benefit patients and detect many cancers earlier.
  • Ultimately Galleri could be used in routine visits with GPs to detect multiple types of cancer early, which may improve the chance of successful treatment and potentially decrease unnecessary invasive biopsies and expensive imaging.

The University of Oxford has announced a partnership with GRAIL, to evaluate the use of a new multi-cancer early detection (MCED) test in the NHS. The nation-wide SYMPLIFY study will investigate a MCED test developed by GRAIL, known as Galleri, for patients with non-specific symptoms that may be a result of cancer. 

The aim of the SYMPLIFY study is to demonstrate how the test could be used to increase cancer detection rates and simplify diagnostic pathways. Beginning in Summer 2021, SYMPLIFY seeks to recruit around 6,000 symptomatic patients from sites across England and Wales, who have been referred by their GP for testing of their blood samples with Galleri. Results of the Galleri tests will then be used for test validation purposes.

Read the full story on the Oxford Cancer website

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