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Report by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Mindfulness.

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Cross party group of MPs say expanding mindfulness provision in the NHS could save £15 for every £1 spent.

The Mindful Nation UK report lays out promising evidence and makes substantive recommendations as to how mindfulness can improve wellbeing and help meet objectives across multiple policy areas.

Recommendations of the report include:

  • Commissioning Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in the NHS for the 580,000 adults at risk of recurrent depression each year, in line with National Institute For Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Research indicates that incorporating MBCT into the Improving Access To Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme could save £15 for every £1 spent, offering people an alternative to antidepressants, use of which has increased by 500% in 20 years (Gusmão R, Quintão S, McDaid D, et al. Antidepressant Utilization and Suicide in Europe: An Ecological Multi-National Study. PLoS One. Published online June 19 2013 ).
  • Creating three mindfulness Teaching Schools (to be selected by the Department of Education) to pioneer mindfulness teaching, co-ordinate and develop innovation, and disseminate best practice.
  • Training government staff in mindfulness, especially in the health, education and criminal justice sectors.
  • Researching the use of mindfulness training for offender populations in the criminal justice system.

The launch will take place at 1pm on Tuesday 20 October 2015 in the Attlee Suite, Portcullis House.

Speakers will include:

  • Rt Hon Alistair Burt MP - Minister of State for Community and Social Care
  • Tracey Crouch MP - Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Sport, Tourism and Heritage
  • Professor Willem Kuyken - Professor of Clinical Psychology, University of Oxford. Director of the Oxford Mindfulness Centre.
  • Professor Mark Williams – Professor of Clinical Psychology, University of Oxford. Author of bestselling book Mindfulness: Finding Peace in a Frantic World. Mark developed MBCT, along with colleagues John Teasdale and Zindel Segal.
  • Three young people who have undertaken a mindfulness course in their schools

The Mindful Nation UK report is the result of a 12-month inquiry by the APPG on Mindfulness into how mindfulness training can benefit UK services and institutions. The report brings a clear and considered voice to a field that has captured the public imagination and has great potential, but has hitherto been subject to widespread misunderstanding and lack of consistent public information.

This Parliamentary work is of global significance, representing the first time that mindfulness has been seriously considered as national public policy. OMC Director Professor Willem Kuyken comments, "Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy offers a new choice for millions of people with recurrent depression, but as yet high quality provision across the NHS is very patchy. This report makes clear recommendations for how people living with depression who want to engage in their own recovery might better access mindfulness-based cognitive therapy. Its broader vision for a nation where schools, prisons, the health service and workplaces are more mindful is compelling. The University of Oxford Mindfulness Centre is taking forwards a number of initiatives to ensure the field moves forwards sustainably, so that the enthusiasm is underpinned by good science and high quality training."

Oxford Mindfulness Centre

The Oxford Mindfulness Centre (OMC) has supported the Mindfulness APPG work since its inception and offers mindfulness classes in Westminster to peers, MPs and staff. The OMC is an internationally recognised centre of excellence at the University of Oxford, and has been at the forefront of research and development in the field of mindfulness. The OMC works to advance the understanding of evidence-based mindfulness through research, publication, training and dissemination. Our world leading research investigates the mechanisms, efficacy, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and implementation of mindfulness.  We offer a wide range of training, education, and clinical services, all taught by leading experts and teachers in the field, who are training the next generation of MBCT researchers, teachers and trainers. We actively engage in collaborative partnership to shape the field and influence policy nationally and internationally. Through the charitable work of the OMC, we are improving the accessibility of MBCT for those most in need.

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