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The University of Oxford and its partner organisations have been awarded funding that will support the training of over 175 bioscience graduate students as part of £170 million investment in bioscience by the BBSRC (Biotechnology and Biosciences Research Council, part of UK Research and Innovation).

Oxford-led doctoral training partnership to offer over 175 graduate scholarships in the biosciences © Shutterstock

The total investment will fund 1,700 PhD researchers over five annual cohorts at academic institutions all over the UK under the third phase of UKRI-BBSRC’s Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTP). The Oxford Interdisciplinary Bioscience DTP’s share will be over £14M, and matched funding by partner organisations and industry will bring the total investment in the Oxford partnership to over £20 million

This represents the third phase of BBSRC funding for Oxford’s Interdisciplinary Bioscience DTP programme, an innovative four-year DPhil/PhD programme that aims to equip a new generation of researchers with the skills, insight and knowledge needed to tackle the most important challenges in bioscience research, and develop the world-class, highly skilled workforce the UK needs for its future. Oxford’s Interdisciplinary Bioscience DTP was initially funded in 2012 and is part of the University of Oxford’s innovative, interdisciplinary Doctoral Training Centre.

The Oxford Interdisciplinary Bioscience DTP is led by the University of Oxford, in partnership with eight world-class research organisations. Six of these collaborations, The Pirbright Institute, Oxford Brookes University, Diamond Light Source, ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, STFC Central Laser Facility and the Research Complex at Harwell, continue the successful partnership established in the second phase of DTP funding. For the third phase two new organisations have joined the partnership, the Novo Nordisk Research Centre Oxford (NNRCO), an innovative target discovery and translational research institute which opened in Oxford in 2017; and the Rosalind Franklin Institute, a new national institute based at Harwell dedicated to transforming life science through interdisciplinary research and technology development.

Read more (University of Oxford website)

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