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We are delighted to announce that in recognition of the alliance between Oxford University and University College London, the Centre for the Acceleration of Medical Innovation (CAMI) is being renamed CASMI, the Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation.

2012-12-05 CASMICASMI’s board will now be chaired jointly by Sir John Bell of Oxford and Sir John Tooke of UCL. This unique venture not only offers the Centre the support, infrastructure and international reputation of both institutions but also maximises engagement with academics at the forefront of their fields.

CASMI aims to address the issues that have lead to current failures in the translation of basic bioscience into affordable and widely adopted new treatments.

CASMI will continue the work on Adaptive Licensing (a new approach to enabling earlier access for patients to new medicines), the regulation of cell therapy and the future environment for stratified medicine. In 2013 we plan to extend into other key areas central to the effective generation, development, regulation and adoption of innovative medical technologies, and we welcome dialogue with supporters and collaborators on this future agenda.

See more on the CASMI website

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