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Five Oxford academics, including three from the Medical Sciences Division, are among fifty eminent scientists who have been elected as Fellows of the Royal Society for their exceptional contributions to science.

None © OUI/Greg Smolonski

This year’s Fellows are:

Sarah C. Darby, Professor of Medical Statistics, Nuffield Department of Population Health. Find out more

Véronique Gouverneur, Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.

Marta Kwiatkowska, Professor of Computing Systems, Department of Computer Science.

Anant Parekh, Professor of Physiology, Department of Physiology Anatomy & Genetics, and Director of the Centre for Integrative Physiology. Professor Anant said: ‘It is of course very humbling to receive such an honour. However, this really reflects the great support I’ve had from my department as well as the contributions from excellent young scientists I have been lucky enough to work with in my group over many years.’ Find out more

Matthew Rushworth, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Experimental Psychology. Find out more

 

Over the course of the Royal Society’s vast history, it is our Fellowship that has remained a constant thread and the substance from which our purpose has been realised: to use science for the benefit of humanity. This year’s newly elected Fellows and Foreign Members of the Royal Society embody this, being drawn from diverse fields of enquiry—epidemiology, geometry, climatology—at once disparate, but also aligned in their pursuit and contributions of knowledge about the world in which we live, and it is with great honour that I welcome them as Fellows of the Royal Society.

Venki Ramakrishnan, President of the Royal Society

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