Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

To help reduce the overuse of antibiotics, Oxford researchers today released a new, easy to use online tool – Antibiotic Footprint Calculator – that could make an important contribution in the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR), one of the world’s most significant emerging threats to public health.

Drawing of a pill in a dish, with the text 'Tracing your antibiotic foorprint. How much do your medicine consumption and meat intake contribute towards your and the global antibiotic footprint? Join the effort to help the world by reducing your antibiotic foorprint.'

The world’s first readily available online tool of its kind, Antibiotic Footprint Calculator lets a user quickly estimate their antibiotic footprint: how many total mgs of antibiotics they consume per year, both directly from taking antibiotics and indirectly from eating meat from animals fed antibiotics.

Since antibiotic consumption varies significantly around the globe, the Calculator also includes per capita (average) national antibiotic consumption data from 218 countries – allowing users to compare their footprint with others and against their own — or any other — country’s average.

Among countries with open-access and official data of both human and animal consumptions available, Thailand has the highest country average at 38.56 grams/person/year –  significantly higher than countries with the lowest footprint: Estonia (5.74 grams/person/year), Netherlands (6.57 grams/person/year) and Austria (6.59 grams/person/year).

“People in low and middle-income countries may take at least two courses of oral antibiotics each year for common cold or acute diarrhea,” explained Antibiotic Footprint developer Mahidol University Asst Prof Direk Limmathurotsakul, Head of Microbiology at the Bangkok-centered Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU), part of the Centre for Tropical Medicine & Global Health in the Nuffield Department of Medicine.

Read the full story on the Centre for Tropical Medicine & Global Health website

Similar stories

Oxford University wins prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize

Her Majesty The Queen has approved the award of The Queen’s Anniversary Prizes to twenty-one higher and further education institutions, including Oxford University, in the most recent round of the independently reviewed scheme. This prestigious award is the highest national honour available to universities and FE colleges across the UK.

Jenner Institute named Covid Innovation Heroes

The team at the University of Oxford’s Jenner Institute has been celebrated for their global pandemic work by The Oxford Trust’s Covid Innovation Heroes Award­ 2021.

Study reveals ‘stop-eating’ response to DNA damage

A new study from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine sheds light on the mechanism by which DNA damage suppresses appetite, a finding with implications for understanding the appetite lowering side-effects of chemotherapy.

Fiona Powrie appointed new Deputy Chair of Wellcome’s Board of Governors

Fiona Powrie, Director of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford has been selected as the next Deputy Chair of Wellcome’s Board of Governors.

World’s first cancer prevention trial to test diabetes drug in patients with high-risk genetic condition

Oxford researchers will lead a £2m national cancer prevention trial to assess the benefit a diabetes drug has in patients with Li Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS), a genetic condition that impacts 1 in 20,000 people worldwide and puts them at a 70-90% lifetime risk of cancer.