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The parts of the world that would benefit most from research on the biggest health problems – like malaria, HIV, maternal health problems and diarrhoea – are also the regions where that research is most lacking.

Crucial evidence is not being generated because many doctors and nurses on the ground lack research experience and support. Effort is also regularly duplicated or conducted using different criteria in different territories and studies. Sometimes studies fall by the wayside from lack of simple resources and guidance on best practice. The development of better and more local research in the area of global health is crucial.

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