Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Stewart Humble, Postgraduate Student in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics (DPAG) shares the story of his journey to Oxford and what he has discovered here.

NIH-OxCam: a graduate student's journey to Oxford

Stewart Humble came to the Wade-Martins Lab at DPAG from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans during Michaelmas Term in October 2016 as part of the National Institutes of Health Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Programme (NIH-OxCam), an accelerated, individualised doctoral training programme, to help him make the transition to a Physician-Scientist career path. This opened up the world of basic science, translational research, and international collaboration. Over the summer of 2019, Stewart organised a lab symposium to encourage and inspire students from his home university to consider the opportunities available to them. This is the story of his journey to Oxford and what he has discovered here.

Stewart was not always on the path to becoming a Research Scientist. Having completed his undergraduate education at Louisiana State University (LSU) in Baton Rouge, in his native US state of Louisiana, he entered medical school at LSU Health Science Center New Orleans in 2014. However, he felt something was missing, until he attended the LSU Neuroscience Grand Rounds lecture that presented a patient with epilepsy from New Orleans. “It helped me put together the piece that was missing, and for me that was doing meaningful research in the lab and being exposed to the most cutting-edge technologies. It was the first time I’d heard about translational research - bench to bedside - where research in the lab directly affects patient care.”

The groundwork for this lightbulb moment had already been laid during Stewart’s undergraduate degree. Between his third and fourth year in the summer of 2011, Stewart undertook study abroad in South Africa, led by Dean Nancy Clark, to fulfil one of the tenets of LSU’s Ogden Honors College curriculum, designed to enhance students’ educational experience. He visited a small rural village where mother to child transmission of HIV was prevalent. “It’s completely preventable, and while the trip wasn’t primarily science oriented, it was a transformative experience because it helped to solidify in my mind the direction I wanted to go. The idea of becoming a Physician-Scientist hadn’t really struck me yet, but I was able to strengthen my passion to go into biomedicine.”

Read more (DPAG website)

This story is also featured on the Oxford University Medium Blog.

Similar stories

Labelling proteins through the diet gives new insights into how collagen-rich tissues change as we age

A new study, published in eLife, uses advanced tissue analysis technology to show how the incorporation of new proteins changes in bone and cartilage with age.

Drug could help diabetic hearts recover after heart attack - Oxford research

Researchers at the University of Oxford have identified a drug that could ultimately help improve heart function in people with diabetes who have heart attacks.

Largest ever global study of tuberculosis identifies genetic causes of drug resistance

Using cutting-edge genomic sequencing techniques, researchers at the University of Oxford have identified almost all the genomic variation that gives people resistance to 13 of the most common tuberculosis (TB) drug treatments.

Peter Horby receives prestigious award for outstanding service to public health

The Faculty of Public Health (FPH) has awarded its prestigious Alwyn Smith Prize to Professor Sir Peter Horby (Nuffield Department of Medicine) for 2020/2021 in recognition of his outstanding service to public health as a global leader in epidemic science.

Six new Fellowships announced as part of Oxford-Bristol Myers Squibb Fellowships Programme

The Oxford - Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) Fellowships Programme continued to demonstrate significant progress over the last year, despite the challenges associated with the global pandemic, including restricted lab access and work from home guidance. Today, we are pleased to announce six new Oxford-BMS Fellowships for 2021.

Researchers set out steps to address mental health effects of the pandemic on young people

Researchers have outlined 14 steps that schools, mental health services and policymakers can take to help children and young people whose mental health has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.