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Nicola Blackwood, the MP for Oxford West and Abingdon, spent the day in Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences with Professor Kathryn Wood and her research group, Transplantation Research Immunology Group (TRIG) last Friday, 17th January 2014. This was a reciprocal visit arranged through the Royal Society’s MP- Scientist pairing scheme which aims to build bridges between parliamentarians and some of the best scientists in the UK.

The aim of the visit was to demonstrate how translational research is taken from “bench to bedside”, and how discoveries made in the lab can eventually impact the treatments that patients receive.

During the day, Nicola met with Kathryn and the group and had the opportunity to discuss the group’s portfolio of research and see some of the different techniques used in the lab such as how stem cells are grown, and how cells are sorted and imaged.  Nicola also visited the Oxford Transplant Centre where she met Professor Peter Friend and some of the staff and patients.

2014-01-24 Pairing SchemeAt the end of the day, Nicola tweeted:   “Just spent an amazing day with Prof Wood's transplant & Immunology team at JR …”   

Image: from left to right: Kathryn Wood, Nicola Blackwood, Liz Wallin 

Link: 

Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences  

Transplantation Research Immunology Group

Nicola Blackwood

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