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The Radcliffe Department of Medicine (RDM) is today (25 March 2013) hosting its Inaugural Symposium. RDM, which is part of the University of Oxford’s Medical Sciences Division, brings together about 500 staff from several research areas.

Radcliffe Department of Medicine logoThe symposium showcased the breadth of research conducted within RDM and gave researchers from across the department the opportunity to hear about their colleagues work and share ideas. In an effort to increase internal collaborations, RDM has developed an innovative funding scheme in which researchers collaborating across the department will be eligible to apply for additional funding. 

The Radcliffe Department of Medicine was formed in 2012 through an amalgamation of the Departmentof Cardiovascular Medicine, the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism (OCDEM), the majority of research groups from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (WIMM), the Nuffield Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, the Oxford Acute Vascular Imaging Centre (AVIC) and the academic groups in Geratology and Stroke who were formerly members of the Nuffield Department of Medicine,  Experimental Medicine Division. These latter groups, together with a new programme in Experimental Therapeutics and the new Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation (CASMI), will now constitute the Investigative Medicine Division (IMD) of RDM.

Head of Department, Professor Hugh Watkins commented: “The motivation for forming the RDM was to bring groups together that could add value to one another and I think the breadth and quality of research presented today shows just how great the potential is."

Links: 

Radcliffe Department of Medicine

Medical Sciences Division

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