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Researchers at the University of Oxford are starting a new study to explore the effectiveness of the anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drug adalimumab as a treatment for patients with COVID-19 in the community, especially care homes.

Nurse or doctor holding elderly patient's hand with care

The AVID-CC trial, which will be conducted by Oxford Clinical Trials Research Unit (OCTRU), will enrol up to 750 patients from community care settings throughout the UK.

It is funded by the COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator, an initiative set up by Wellcome, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Mastercard, with support from an array of public and philanthropic donors.

Residents of care homes were particularly hard hit by the first wave of COVID-19 in the UK and other countries. Research has identified limited treatments that are effective for patients in hospital with COVID-19, but no effective treatments have yet been identified for those in the community care settings, many of whom may have severe symptoms.

The full story is available on the Nuffield Department of Rheumatology, Orthopaedics & Musculoskeletal Sciences website

The story is also featured on the University of Oxford website

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