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Oxford University researchers have found the Achilles heel of certain cancer cells – mutations in a gene called SETD2.

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Their findings will be presented to the National Cancer Research Institute conference in Liverpool on Monday 2 November 2015.

Oxford University researchers have found the Achilles heel of certain cancer cells – mutations in a gene called SETD2. Their findings will be presented to the National Cancer Research Institute conference in Liverpool this Monday (2 Nov 15).

It is well known that mutations drive cancer cell growth and resistance to treatment.  However, these mutations can also become a weak point for a tumour. The Oxford team found that that was the case for cancer cells with mutations in a key cancer gene called SETD2.

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