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A new pan-divisional initiative has launched at the University of Oxford, bringing together the collective force of cancer research, outreach and care that happen across the city of Oxford.

Overlapping images of medical research, a young child and a brain scan © Oxford Cancer

Cancer remains the second leading cause of death worldwide, with an estimated 10 million cancer mortalities in 2020 alone. It continues to be a barrier to increasing life expectancy in every country of the world.

Today Oxford Cancer launches at the University of Oxford – a new pan-divisional research theme which has been established to support researchers across the city of Oxford in solving the key challenges in cancer research. Through this network, Oxford is tackling the biggest questions and highlights Oxford’s commitment to cancer as one of its strategic research themes.

Oxford has over 900 cancer researchers based across the University and Hospitals Foundation Trust, with academic strengths in a wide variety of areas, including immunology, data science, cell biology, physical science & drug development. Bringing together this expertise is what Oxford Cancer aims to do, in order to facilitate multi-disciplinary research across its partners. It ultimately aims to solve the key challenges cancer represents through developing and delivering novel strategies for early detection and curative treatment of a range of different cancer types. This approach will be informed by the latest fundamental scientific discoveries and underpinned by world leading data science and technological developments that are unique to Oxford.

“Through Oxford Cancer, our mission is to enable and combine the best research and clinical resources in order to innovate cancer treatment and care world-wide. We aim to do this through discovery, collaboration and education – and empowered by the strategic leadership and world-leading facilities here in Oxford.”

  • Professor Tim Elliott, co-Director, Oxford Cancer.

“With over 900 researchers across 20+ departments and 5 University & OUH divisions, cancer research is everywhere in Oxford. We are very excited to launch the new Oxford Cancer network, with the aim of bringing together all those with a shared interest in cancer, to address urgent and emerging cancer patient needs, informed by the best basic science”

  • Professor Mark Middleton, co-Director, Oxford Cancer

Oxford Cancer also coordinates a variety of researcher support services, for Oxford researchers and their partner organisations, to help break down barriers to accessing key expertise and enhance the patient impact of their work.

For more information about this new network, it’s strategic research themes, services and latest news from the Oxford Cancer community, please check out the new Oxford Cancer website and the launch FAQs.

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