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Bullying in teenage years is strongly associated with depression later on in life, suggests new research published in The BMJ this week. 

Depression is a major public health problem with high economic and societal costs. There is a rapid increase in depression from childhood to adulthood and one contributing factor could be bullying by peers. But the link between bullying at school and depression in adulthood is still unclear due to limitations in previous research.

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