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Three projects from the Medical Sciences Division have received funding in the latest round of the Public Engagement with Research Seed Fund. Dr Alex Hendry, Professor Chrystalina Antoniades and Dr George Busby have all received awards for innovative projects to engage the public with medical research.

A watering can watering plant that is growing out coins © Shutterstock

BABYLAB ON TOUR

Alex HendryDr Alex Hendry, Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Oxford BabyLab (Department of Experimental Psychology) received funding for a BabyLab on Tour project, which aims to take research on early development into the community. The project will include a series of play-based workshops and feature tips on how parents can support their child’s Executive Function development. Parents will also be able to take part in a mini-study session where they will gain an insider view into the joys and challenges of infant research. 

 

Picturing Parkinson’s: building bridges between patients and neuroscientists

Chrystalina AntoniadesProfessor Chrystalina Antoniades, Associate Professor in the NeuroMetrology Lab (Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences) received funding for this project which aims to bridge the gap between objective research into Parkinson’s disease and subjective patient experience of the condition, through the medium of fine art. The project will provide a supportive space for patients to tell their stories and have them interpreted by professional artists. It will enable us (and other neuroscientist colleagues) to see the object of our research transformed and expressed in an imaginative way, which will shape our thinking about the work we do. The project will challenge us to bring creative approaches to our scientific work, and build capacity for public engagement with patient and public audiences. The aim is for the outputs of the project to be used to present a holistic view of Parkinson’s as it is experienced, studied, and treated. 

 

The Mobile Malaria Project Expedition Comic Strip

George BusbyDr George Busby, Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics (Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine) received funding for The Mobile Malaria Project Expedition Comic Strip. The project aims to inform young people on the challenges of malaria research in Africa, engage them with how cutting edge science is being used to control malaria and excite them about potential scientific careers by documenting real life scientists working in Africa. This will be achieved through a series of illustrations and comic strips in the MMP (Mobile Malaria Project) Expedition Comic. 

 

Further information

The University of Oxford Public Engagement with Research Seed fund provides grants for researchers to develop, deliver and evaluate Public Engagement with Research projects and activities. Grants of up to £4000 are available and the next call will be in September 2019, find out more here.

Find out more about the Public Engagement with Research Seed Fund and previously funded projects

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